OMAD Diet vs. Intermittent Post (16/8): Do you work one day a day? Thomas Delaware 2

OMAD Diet vs. Intermittent Post (16/8): Do you work one day a day? Thomas Delaware



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OMAD Diet vs. Intermittent Post (16/8): Do you work one day a day? Thomas DeLauer … Prolonged fasting, intermittent fasting, fasting fasting and now a fasting meal a day. What the hell do we have to do? Well, let's look at the different forms of starvation, and in this video, let's really break one meal a day, an OMAD diet, to a starvation in 16: 8 style. So what I want to do in this video is to help you understand these two types of starvation and what can work better for you by looking at three highly respected research.

Well, first of all, what the hell is the OMAD diet? This is something that is gaining popularity lately, and what it means is one meal a day. In essence, it is a form of periodic starvation, only in a slightly more extreme sense. So basically what you are doing is that you are fasting for 23 or 23 1/2 hours, and then combine all your calories in a meal a day. Sounds a bit intense and quite honest. More often, many of us know periodically fasting as something that is more than a 16-hour fast, eight-hour nutrition window. So what I would like to do is compare OMAD with 16: 8, but I would also like to compare it to the traditional traditional three square meals a day. Morning, lunch and dinner.

So the first thing I want to do is I want to dive into a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Research. It was an eight-week study that looked at two groups, was not it? One group has traditionally consumed three square dishes, right? Morning, noon and evening. The other group consumed one meal a day. And they wanted to look at the overall results for body composition and what happened after eight weeks of eating this way. So what they did was that each of these subjects eats the right amount of calories to maintain their weight. So everyone has eaten a different amount, but everything is related to what they weigh and what is needed to keep them roughly the same. So what they found at the end of the study is that both groups are approximately the same weight. However, the group per meal per day lost an average of 4.6 pounds when the other group lost 3.1. So we are still pretty close, but the group of one meal per day has lost a little more body weight.

Now both groups kept the same body weight so there was no muscle loss but there was little fat loss. Now everything is fine and dandies, and we really like science, and we like to know that a meal a day will allow you to burn a little more fat than three square meals, but it's really not that aggressive. Honestly, it is not enough to persuade me to consolidate my entire meal into a 30-minute window. So let's take a look at another study published in the Journal of Translational Medicine, and this study looked at a more than 16: 8 fasting window against a typical breakfast, lunch and dinner.

References:
1) A controlled, reduced-calorie, low-calorie diet study in healthy, normally elderly adults. (N.d.). Retrieved from

2) Impact of reduced frequency of eating without limiting calories on glucose regulation in healthy, normal men and middle-aged women. (N.d.). Retrieved from

3) Omad diet – one meal a day diet. (N.d.). Retrieved from

4) Effects of eight weeks of limited feeding (16/8) on primary metabolism, maximal strength, body composition, inflammation and cardiovascular risk factors in trained men with resistance. (2016, October 13). Retrieved from

5) Effects of eight weeks of limited feeding (16/8) on primary metabolism, maximal strength, body composition, inflammation and cardiovascular risk factors in trained men with resistance. (N.d.). Retrieved from

6) A 16: 8 fasting diet actually works, a study found. (N.d.). Retrieved from

7) Effects of 8-hour limited nutrition on body weight and risk factors for metabolic diseases in adult adults: Pilot study – IOS Press. (2018, June 15). Retrieved from

8) Trepanowski JF, et al. (N.d.). Effect of an Alternative Fasting Day on Weight Loss, Weight Maintenance, and Cardioprotection among Metabolic Healthy Obesity Adults: Randomized Cli … – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from.