Added sugar associated with increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease 2

Added sugar associated with increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease



Many adults in the US consume more added sugar (added to the processing or preparation of foods that do not naturally occur as fruit and fruit juices) than expert committees recommend for healthy eating, and consumption of added sugar is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine, a publication in the JAMA Network.

Suggestions for added sugar consumption vary and there is no commonly accepted threshold for unhealthy levels. For example, the Institute of Medicine recommends that added sugar accounts for less than 25% of total calories, the World Health Organization recommends less than 10%, and the American Heart Association recommends limiting added sugars to less than 100 calories a day for women and 150 people. calories daily for men, according to the study.

The main sources of added sugar in the diet of Americans are:

beverages, sweetened with sugar
cereal desserts
fruit drinks
dairy desserts
candy.
A box of plain soda contains about 35 grams of sugar (about 140 calories).

Quanhe Yang, a Doctor of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta and colleagues, used data from national health studies to study added sugar consumption as a percentage of daily calories and assess the relationship between consumption and GCC.

The results of the study show that the average daily calories of added sugar increased from 15.7% in 1988-1994 to 16.8% in 1999 to 2004 and decreased to 14.9% in 2005-2010 .

In 2005-2010, most adults (71.4%) consumed 10% of calories from added sugar and about 10% of adults consume 25% or more of the added sugar.

The authors note that the risk of death from AHU increases with a higher percentage of calories from the added sugar. Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (seven portions or more per week) is associated with an increased risk of death from GCC.

"Our results support current recommendations for limiting calorie intake of added sugars in US diets," the authors conclude.

Be warned.

editing
Tags: cardiovascular disease, added sugar hazards, sugar, sugar and heart disease risks