New Path: Prevent Diabetes with Interval Post

As known and commonly known, the fatty liver is thoroughly explored. However, little is known about excess pancreatic fat and its effects on the onset of type 2 diabetes. Research team led by Professor Annette Schürmann and Professor Tim Schulz of the German Institute for Human Nutrition (DIfE) has now discovered that mice with excessive weight are sensitive to Diabetes has a high accumulation of fat cells in the pancreas. On the other hand, mice resistant to diabetes despite their high weight because of their genetic composition had almost no fat in the pancreas but in the liver. "The accumulation of fat outside fatty tissue, for example in the liver, muscle, or even bone, has a negative effect on these organs and the whole body." The influence of fatty cells in the pancreas has not been clear so far, "explains Schürmann, Head of the Department of Experimental Dialectology at DIfE and spokesperson German Diabetes Research Center (DZD).

Intermittent starvation makes greasy melted pancreas

The team of scientists divided fat-sensitive animals into two groups: the first group was allowed to eat as much as they wanted. The other group received intermittent fast treatment: one day rodents got unlimited food and the next day they did not get anything. After five weeks, researchers could see differences in pancreatic mice: in the first group, fat cells accumulated. The animals of the other group, however, had almost no fatty deposits in the pancreas.

Fatty cells stimulate the release of insulin

To find out how fatty cells can break the pancreas function, Schürmann and Schulz scientists first isolated the fatty progenitor cells from the pancreas of mice and differentiated them into mature fat cells. Subsequently, when mature fatty cells are grown together with Langerhans's pancreatic islets, the "island" beta cells are increasingly releasing insulin. "We suspect that increased insulin release, the Langerhans islands of sensitive animals on diabetes exhaust more quickly and after a while fully function, so that fat in the pancreas can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes," says Schürmann.

The importance of fatty pancreatic tissue to prevent diabetes

Current data suggests that only fat in the liver must be reduced to prevent type 2 diabetes. "It may be that the accumulation of fat in the pancreas under certain genetic conditions contributes significantly to the development of type 2 diabetes," says Schulz Department of Development and Nutrition of Fat Cells. As a promising therapeutic approach, an interval post could be used in the future. Advantages: It is non-invasive, easy to integrate into everyday life and can be used without medicines.

An interval post – also known as an occasional post – means to abstain from food at certain time windows. Water, unsweetened tea and black coffee are allowed 24 hours a day. Depending on the method, meal breaks last between 16 and 24 hours or a maximum of 500 to 600 calories are consumed within two days of a week. The most common form of fattening interval is method 16: 8: Eat eight hours a day and stay for the remaining 16 hours. Meal – usually breakfast – is omitted.

** Langerhans 'islets – also known as island or Langerhans' islets – are accumulation of cells that produce hormones in the pancreas. A healthy adult has about one million Langerhans islands. Each "island" has a diameter of 0.2-0.5 millimeters. Beta cells produce insulin for lowering blood sugar and make up about 65 to 80 percent of islet cells. With elevated levels of blood sugar, they release insulin into the bloodstream so they return to normal.

literature:

Original publication: Quiclet, C., Dittberner, N., Gässler, A., Stadion, M., Gerst, F., Helms, A., Baumeier, C., Schulz, TJ, Schürmann, A .: Pancreatic adipocytes mediate in hypersecretion of insulin in mice sensitive to diabetes. Metabolism. 97, 9-17 (2019).
[https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2019.05.005]

Similar article: Baumeier, C., Kaiser, D., Heeren, J., Scheja, L., John, C., Weise, C., Eravci, M., Lagerpusch, M., Schulze, H.-G., Schwenk, RW, Schürmann, A .: Limitation of calories and occasional starvation of old lipid drops of proteoma and diacilglycerol and prevention of diabetes in NZO mice. Biochem. Biophys. Acta / Mol. Cell Biol Lipids 1851, 566-576 (Open Access) (2015).
[https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbalip.2015.01.013]

Context:

German Institute for Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke (DIfE)

DIfE is a member of the Leibniz Association. Examines the causes of eating disorders and develops a new strategy for prevention, therapy and nutrition recommendations. His research interests include the causes and consequences of metabolic syndrome, combination of obesity, hypertension (high blood pressure), insulin resistance and lipid metabolism disorders, the role of healthy aging diet and the biological foundations of food choice and nutritional behavior. DIfE is also a partner of the German Diabetes Research Center (DZD), which is funded by BMBF.

German Center for Diabetes Research e.V. (DZD)

DZD is one of six German Health Research Centers. It brings together experts in the field of diabetes research and links basic research, epidemiology and clinical application. The purpose of the DZD has been to make a significant contribution to successful, customized prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus by means of a new, integrative research approach. The members of the association are the Helmholtz Zentrum München – the German Center for Disease Control (DDS) in Düsseldorf, the German Institute for Nutrition Research (DIfE) in Potsdam-Rehbrücke, the Institute for Diabetes and Metabolic Disease Research at the Helmholtz Center in Munich at the University Eberhard Karls in Tübingen and the Paul Langerhans Institute in Dresden at Helmholtz Zentrum München at Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital in TU Dresden, associate partners at Heidelberg, Cologne, Leipzig, Lübeck and Munich, as well as other project partners.

Media Contacts:

Prof. Annette Schürmann
Department of Experimental Diabetes
German Institute for Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke (DIfE)
Tel .: +49 (0) 33200 88-2368
E-mail:

Sonja Schächen
President of Press and Public Relations
German Institute for Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke (DIfE)
Tel .: +49 33200 88-2278
E-mail: /

scientific contact:
Prof. Annette Schürmann
Department of Experimental Diabetes
German Institute for Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke (DIfE)
Tel .: +49 (0) 33200 88-2368
E-mail:

Original Issues:
Quiclet, C., Dittberner, N., Gässler, A., Stadion, M., Gerst, F., Helms, A., Baumeier, C., Schulz, TJ, Schürmann, A .: Pancreatic adipocytes mediate insulin hypersecretion in mice susceptible to diabetes. Metabolism. 97, 9-17 (2019).
[https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2019.05.005]

idw 2019/07