Are gut bacteria really managers of increase and decrease? 2

Are gut bacteria really managers of increase and decrease?

Are gut bacteria really managers of increase and decrease?

08/19/2019

Greifswald scientists investigated the role of microorganisms

Is the influence of gut bacteria in overweight people greater than previously thought? Greifswald scientists have monitored diabetics with severe weight problems (obesity) for three months as part of a multimodal structured weight loss program, and have noted altered intestinal flora during bowel movements.


Are gut bacteria really managers of increase and decrease? 3Are gut bacteria really managers of increase and decrease? 4

Want to continue exploring the role of bacteria in the gut? Antje Steveling and Dr. Fabian Frost.

Photo by UMG / Manuela Janke

"We have been able to show that initial meal replacement therapy has a positive effect on the composition of intestinal bacteria, and probably also contributes to good weight loss," said Prof. Dr. Honey. Markus M. Lerch, Director of Internal Medicine Division A at Greifswald University Medical Center, who conducted investigations with his team and other scientists. The results of the study were published in July in the international online journal PLOS ONE *.

For the first six weeks, participants between the ages of 18 and 70 received only liquid meal replacement meals with a maximum of 800 kcal per day. Over the next four weeks, this has already been partially supplemented with healthy foods and replaced with a low-calorie diet over the past five weeks. Women and men lost between 11.4 and 30.1 kg during this period, and key values ​​for diabetics such as blood sugar, insulin levels and uric acid were significantly improved.

"Using modern sequencing methods, we analyzed bacterial composition in bowel movements of patients before changing their diet, at the end of the period after six weeks of fasting and at the end of the program," Dr. Fabian Frost, the first author of the study.

"After the fasting period, the composition of the gut bacteria changed significantly in all subjects. We saw an increase in bacterial diversity, and in particular a decrease in the bacterial Collinsella type.

Interestingly, at the end of the program, most changes in gut bacteria almost return to baseline below the home-cooked diet, but Collinsella's bacterial count remains 8.4 times below baseline. "For us, it can be an indicator of improved health through weight loss," the gastroenterologist said.

The impact of the intestinal flora has not been sufficiently investigated

In recent years, a significant focus of many diseases on
The composition of bacteria located in the gut. Thus, a link could be found between the intestinal flora and various diseases, for example, diabetes mellitus and obesity, but also depression and Alzheimer's dementia.

People suffering from obesity have been shown to have fewer different bacteria in the gut than leaner contemporaries. Also, meanwhile, greater weight gain was observed in patients with less bacterial species diversity over a period of time.

"Fully investigated, the interaction between bacteria and their control functions is not yet. However, it must be assumed that certain bacteria provide more energy and are absorbed into the body from the same food intake than other bacteria. The bacterial composition seems to be one of the reasons why people digest food so differently, why some can slowly get and lose weight and others slowly, ”said senior doctor Dr. Med. Antje Steveling, Head of Greifswald Admiral Center.

Research into the effects of gut bacteria on body weight and health in the future will be further intensified on Greifswald Unimedizin. "It is also interesting how the activating and positive composition of the gut flora can be maintained after the completion of the diet program," said Dr. Frost.

Diversity in the gut

In addition to genetic factors, food plays a crucial role in the composition of the gut flora. The gut is home to 38 billion bacteria and these are the decisive factors for whether we remain healthy or become ill. The species-rich intestinal microbiome, the so-called totality of microorganisms, has health effects, and many diseases are associated with a decrease in bacterial biodiversity in the gut. About 40,000 different bacteria are known. Because the bacteria are much smaller than the cells of the human body, these bacteria together weigh only about two pounds.

* Original article in PLOS ONE
Phylogenetic diversity of the microbiota and reduced cholinella level in obese type 2 diabetics: Pilot study
Fabian Frost, Lena J. Storck, Tim Kacprowski, Simone Gardener, Malta Rühlemann, Corinna Bang, Andre Franke, Uwe Völker, Ali A. Aghdassi, Antje Steveling, Julia Mayerle, Frank U. Weiss, Georg Homuth, Markus M. Lerch
Published: July 18, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219489
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0219489

Photo by UMG / Manuela Janke:
Want to continue exploring the role of bacteria in the gut? Antje Steveling and Dr. Fabian Frost.

Greifswald University Medical Center
Internal Medicine Clinic and Clinic A
Director: prof. Dr. Honey. honey. Markus M. Lerch
Sauerbruchstraße, 17475 Greifswald
T + 49 3834 86-72 30
E gastro@uni-greifswald.de

Head of Communications and Marketing
Christian Arns
T +49 3834 86-52 28
E christian.arns@med.uni-greifswald.de
http://www.medizin.uni-greifswald.de
http://www.facebook.com/UnimedizinGreifswald
Instagram / Twitter @UMreif forest

Scientific contact:

Prof. honey. Markus M. Lerch
T + 49 3834 86-72 30 E gastro@uni-greifswald.de

Original issues:

* Original article in PLOS ONE
Phylogenetic diversity of the microbiota and reduced cholinella level in obese type 2 diabetics: Pilot study
Fabian Frost, Lena J. Storck, Tim Kacprowski, Simone Gardener, Malta Rühlemann, Corinna Bang, Andre Franke, Uwe Völker, Ali A. Aghdassi, Antje Steveling, Julia Mayerle, Frank U. Weiss, Georg Homuth, Markus M. Lerch
Published: July 18, 2019
https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219489
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0219489

Constanze Steinke | idw – Science Information Service